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Two Soups To Try

Wow, it’s been forever since I’ve posted to Making All Things New. For my first excuse I’m going to share that doctoral work is hard! Now I can clearly see why so few people actually finish. My second excuse is that, while I haven’t been posting to this main page of Making All Things New, I’ve been communicating on a regular basis to all those who attended my October Retreat. Sadly, that kind of left you out, but it’s a New Year, and I’m getting back on track today!

Maryland, where I live, hasn’t had too bad of a winter so far, thank goodness. Since we’re several weeks away from spring, I thought I’d share a couple of new soup recipes with you, and I hope you’ll give them both a try before winter is over.

I have to mention that, although my photo includes both soups, I wouldn’t serve them together. I was just trying to stick to one photo!

Enjoy, and, if you liked them, please send a reply message.

The first recipe is for Curried Split Pea Soup with Spinach. I don’t know about you, but I love the taste of curry. I only had it once or twice when I was young, but when I moved to Baltimore to attend Johns Hopkins, there were several Indian restaurants within walking distance from where I lived, and a couple were the “all you can eat” kind. The rest is history. If you don’t have any curry powder on hand, you can pick up a small McCormick spice container from the grocery store. McCormick’s is not too spicy and adds a subtle richness.

Curried Split-Pea Soup with Spinach

makes 6 servings

2 tb. extra virgin olive oil
2 medium onions, chopped
2 small carrots, chopped
2 stalks celery, chopped
3-4 gloves garlic, finely chopped
1 32 oz. low-sodium vegetable broth (I used Trader Joe’s)
2 cups water
1 cup dried split peas
2 tb. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1 tsp. curry powder
1 bay leaf
1 cup coarsely chopped fresh spinach
salt and pepper to taste.

In medium stockpot, heat oil over medium low heat. Add onions, carrots, celery and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about ten minutes.

Add broth, water, split peas, parsley, bay leaf, curry powder, salt and pepper and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer gently, stirring occasionally, until peas are tender, about 90 minutes.

Stir in spinach. Cook until spinach is wilted, about five minutes. If the soup is too thick, add a bit more water. Serve hot.

In the next recipe, the surprise for me was the taste of the whole cloves, which dissolved into this thick and hearty soup. I guess you could leave the sherry out if you wanted to, but it was another nice addition to an old favorite.

Sherried Black Bean Soup

serves 8

1 lb. dried black beans, rinsed and drained
8 cups water
2 tb. extra-virgin olive oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 stalk celery, chopped
1 medium carrot, chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leafed parsely
1/8 tsp. whole cloves
1/8 tsp. mustard seed
1 bay leaf
green onion for garnish
1/3 cup dry sherry
salt and pepper to taste

In a large stock pot, bring the beans and four cups of water to a boil. Boil briskly for two minutes, then remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 1 hour.

In a medium pot, heat olive oil. Add onions, celery, carrot and garlic and cook until soft by not browned. Add remaining four cups of water, parsley, salt and pepper, cloves, mustard seed, and bay leaf. Bring to a low simmer until beans are ready (1 hour). Add this mixture to the larger pot with the beans (and their liquid). Bring to a boil, cover, reduce heat and simmer for about three hours.

Remove and discard bay leaf. Carefully place about half the soup into a blender. Process until smooth. Return puree to stock pot and add sherry. Heat over medium heat for about five minutes. Serve soup hot with sliced green onions on top.

By seedthrower1

I'm passionate about helping people realize that God wants to make something new of them and bring about a permanent transformation in their lives: body, mind, and spirit.

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